Pilots of 320 Squadron Facebook page.

Son of airgunner Richard Heinrich Tessers. I have start a special new webpage on Facebook in memory of all pilots and crews who was at the sq.320 RAF/MLD Mitchell´s at Dunsfold, also at the training schools and later at 8 okt. moved to Melsbroek Belgium. If you have pictures of crews in front of the Mitchell of the Dutch ones, if you know that family had a family or crew member with the sq.320 RAF/MLD let me know that they can tell their stories and put pictures on my webpage, here is the link.

Hawker’s Secret Cold War Airfield:

Dunsfold: Home of the Hunter and Harrier

by Christopher Budgen

A new book will be available in July. Amazon Link

Author Christopher Budgen has spent his life imbued with military aviation. His father and two uncles all served with the RAF during and after the Second World War. His father, Maurice, served in India on Liberators and Tempests before working for Skyways at Dunsfold during the Berlin Airlift and subsequently for Hawker Aircraft as they started production of the superlative Hunter at the aerodrome. Chris followed his father into employment at Dunsfold in the 1970s, initially working on RAF and export Hawks before moving on to Harrier and Sea Harrier. A move to Development saw him become involved in the launch of the Sea Harrier FRS.2 and the HS.125 flying test-bed, as well as numerous trials on the Harrier GR.5 and GR.7. The author of several books on the history of the area and an authority on Hawker aircraft and Dunsfold, Chris is currently engaged as archivist at Brooklands Museum specialising in Hawker and successor companies. Having spent twenty-one years working at Dunsfold, his knowledge allows him to shine a light onto aspects of the company and airfield not widely recognised. Given his family’s close links to the land upon which Dunsfold was subsequently built, Chris is well-placed to tell the story of this previously closed and secretive community.

Last Harrier flying in civilian hands

Art Nalls has announced he wishes to sell his two Sea Harriers. Art currently flies his FA.2 formerly XZ439 originally from Dunsfold and now the oldest Sea Harrier in existence, as well as a two-seat Harrier T.8 (ZD993). Neither aircraft would be permitted to fly in the UK. http://warbirdsnews.com/warbird-articles/art-nalls-hawker-siddeley-harrier-fleet-for-sale.html

You can find more about Art’s passion for Harriers here.

Dunsfold: 439 as FRS2, before pitot change. Photo: Andy Lawson, BAe Systems

New Museum Planning Application

Two years ago the Wings Museum submitted a planning application for a 10,000sqm Museum building on land to the South of Dunsfold Aerodrome.  In 2017 DAHS objected to the proposal  and made specific recommendations.

The application has remained undecided at Waverley Planning Department until now. It was scheduled for consideration by the Eastern Planning Committee on 5th December 2018. The Waverley Planning Case Office recommended approval despite many errors in the submissions.

The Councillors refused the application.

Press Statements:

Download the PDF file .


Download the PDF file .

Could Red Arrows ‘come home’ to Dunsfold?

Many will have seen the news last week that the RAF is closing Scampton – the airbase which, among other things, is the home of the iconic Red Arrows display team. Those with an interest in UK aviation history, including neighbours living around Dunsfold Aerodrome in Surrey, will probably also know that the Hawk trainer jet which is used by the Red Arrows was developed, assembled and first flown at the Dunsfold Aerodrome in 1974.  More than a few people are therefore asking the question – is now the time to consider offering a new base for the Red Arrows, at the historic home of the Hawk, Dunsfold Aerodrome?

Hawk 168 in 1985 over Dunsfold: Image by Andy Lawson/ BAe Systems

Red Arrows and BAe aircraft in 1985 at Dunsfold: Image by Andy Lawson/ BAe Systems

Red Arrows at Dunsfold 2010. Photo courtesy Karen Sutton www.limelight-marketing.co.uk

By coincidence (or may it be providence?), a rare example of a Hawker Hunter fighter jet which has for many years been on public display in a shopping street in Woking, is also looking for a new home. ‘XL623’ was the last Hunter T.7 to be built, and it is believed it first flew at Dunsfold.

T7 Hunter XL 623 as art in Woking
T.7 Hunter XL 623 as art in Woking Photo Courtesy Neil Randell

T.7 Hunter XL 623 being removed from Woking, July 2018 Photo Courtesy Carol Fenton-Balch

XL623. Royal Air Force Hawker Hunter T.7 at RAF Leuchars. Image copyright Jim Cain

Having been donated to Brooklands Museum, and with the help of the Hawker Association, restoration of Hunter T7 XL623  is about to begin – very fittingly at Dunsfold Aerodrome! How good would it be if that aircraft could also find a permanent home at the Dunsfold site?

Dunsfold Aerodrome is also the semi-permanent home of the Brooklands-owned VC10 aircraft, which although not fit to fly, regularly starts up its engines for a short taxi round the runways. In addition, it is a base frequently used by a WW2 Dakota painted in D-Day landing colours.

In the past year, the Aerodrome has benefitted from a flurry of Listings of buildings on the near-intact and still operational airfield.   During 2017, Historic England listed as Grade II;

VSTOL Blast Pads

Engine Running Pens

Royal Observer Corps Monitoring Post

Canadian War Memorial

So are we about to see a resurgence of interest in Dunsfold Aerodrome becoming a living museum as the home of a VC10, Hunter XL623, and – possibly? – a base for the Red Arrows flight of Hawk jets?    Well, while the threat of obliteration of the aerodrome under housing development remains, this would seem a remote dream. But, surely, the site owners, who often cite their interest in the flying history of the airfield, would do well to consider how popular such a proposal might be, and how many tourists the new museum could attract? It may, just, be time for the planes to come home to Dunsfold.

Banner Image: Red Arrows at Dunsfold 2010. Image courtesy of Gareth Stringer

Dunsfold Airfield given approval for 1800 homes.

The Secretary of State has now decided on the fate of the airfield.  After the 3 week long Planning Inquiry on the development plans his Planning Inspector  approved the proposals and the Secretary of State has agreed with that judgement.  The full details of the decision is here.

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/695972/18-03-29_DL_R_Dunsfold_Park_3171287.pdf